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The University of North Carolina at Greensboro presents: 



A University Media Board Production 



The 

1991 

Pine Needles 




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Donald 
Williams 





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Sharon 
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Tamara 
Federici 








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Lauren 
Murphy 




Sarah Jane 
Nuesa 



UNCG — The Cultural Marketplace 

One hazard that v\ill ine\itabl\ face all theise who \\ ish to achie\'e 
their chosen role in life is the ancient ritual of going to the market. The 
market is the place where the axerage person encounters a lexel of noise, 
glitz, and corruption that thev neither expect nor deser\'e. Howex'er, if vou 
enter with the right amount of determination and take the proper cautious 
procedures, it is possible to emerge with exervthing vou need and to 
remain relatixelv unscathed and unaffected h\ the experience. 

The first step to sur\'iving the market is knowing when you have 
entered one. This is not as easv as it sounds. A market is anvwhere that vou 
go to get what vou need. It is also where scores of other people are going 
for the same purpose. The needs of all of these people are related, but e\ery 
one needs something that is unique and different from both vou and each 
other. Often manv of those whose needs are verv similar will group 
together, and you can almost tell justby looking at them what the\' are after. 
Howe\'er, there is a lot of intermingling and vou can often be fooled. 

And a market is where there are lots of people who, for a price, are 
willing to provide you with what you need These people are not alwavs 
efficient. Man\' of them ha\e bizarre idios\'ncrasies. Thev are formed into 
a huge, stampeding biireaucracv- Thev give you directories that have 



Candice 
Adams 




many inaccuracies and do not list exactly what you need. And they are constantly 
building something new that will be wonderful when it is finished, but that is getting in 
your way now. But what you need is often already there, even if it is scattered and located 
in many different departments. A marketplace can also be defined as any gathering of 
a variety of adxocates competing for your acceptance of that which they are advocating. 
Once you are aware that you are in a marketplace, the next step is to know the 
attitude that you should not assume. Most people who enter tell themselves that they are 
only going to "window shop," that they are just going to enjoy the glitz without getting 
caught up in the corruption. This attitude adds to the beauty of the marketplace as an 
aesthetically pure agent of corruption. The 
market slowly sends the minds of people 
into shock, while they continue to indulge 
themseh'es in the experience and try to 
assure themselves that they are remaining 
unaffected. The result is either that they 
pick up something new and get side- 
tracked from their needs, or that they get 
disoriented and find their ability to focus 





Stephanie 
Shaw 



Katrina 
McCullough 





Christine 
Stoney 



Jason 
Stoddard 




on their needs has been reduced, or frequently both. And this occurs each time they enter, 
because it is ahvavs filled with new wonders. 

People ahva\'s know that they are going to be facing new diversions. Construction is 
always going on, there are always different flyers advertising something new, and there is 
always some new fad that everyone is talking about. But the people belie\e that they have 
grown stronger, and thus confidenth' walk into the same traps. 

This strategy is flawed. E\'en trained monks know better than to seek out temptations 
to resist. They would not utilize such a strateg\', and neither should \ou. 

The safest attitude for you to assume when entering is that of a surv i\alist in the jungle. 
You should think of e\'erything in unknown surroundings as being first of all a danger to 
a\oid, and secondh' as a means to getting what \'ou need. To run screaming or to cower 
whimpering at the sight of a lion could be deadly, but neither should you be foolish enough 
to allow yourself to be captixated bv its beauty or to become curious about its nature. The best 
plan is to be aware of its existence, to a\oid it calmh' without making it aware of \'our 
existence, and then to continue on v\-ith \our journey. 

Everyone who enters the marketplace will lea\e with unintended baggage. However, 
if \'ou go in with the proper, cautious attitude, \ ou can lea\ e \\ ith on]\' what \'ou need. 




Tiffany 
Strickland 



Donna 

Styers 





Samantha 
Suffoletta 





Jennifer 
Cloud 



Jennifer 
Drake 




Timothy 
Caviness 






Tristan 
Louis 



Lars 
Sandvik 







Registration 



Heather 
Autry 




Heather 
Hancock 



Then and Now 




Michele 
McDermott 



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Cathy 
Owens 




Tonya 
Wilson 



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Ir ") 


Melissa 


^^ 


Tate 




James 
Money 




Michelle 
Yeargan 




Marua 
Tivohey 



Lynelle 
Pinnix 




David Mclnnis 





Candance 
Johnson 





Nathaniel 
Thompson 



Courtney 
Mack 




Bob Calvin 



Patricia 
Guard 




Joy 
Nichols 






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Shannon 
Oakley 



Dean 
Logan 




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Barney 




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Lynn 


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Gina 
Home 




Cutting Loose 



One weekend my friends and I went on a doughnut run at 3:00 
Sunday morning. Maybe it was the dizziness of having no sleep tha t 
weekend or maybe it was the realization that I was actually in 
college, but a strange feeling came over me. I don't know how to 
explain it;I sat there with all my new friends, thinking about my 
parents. Of all things, my parents! They had no idea where I was or 
who I was with anti at that particular moment, they didn't care. 
Well, they cared but it wasn't the all consuming care that I'd been 
used to. That's a scary feeling when it first hits you! But then, I 
realized that that was the first time I'd thought about them all day. 
I guess that means I'm cutting loose. That's good. ..right? That's 
what they tell me at least. 

Sometimes I wonder if I'm cutting loose enough. My brother is 
a graduate student here, so I still have something of home to hang on 
to in him. I love having my brother here, but there are times when 
a big brother can get in the way. It's not his fault, he still thinks of me 
as his "baby sister." In a way I like having him as a protector. The 
one thing that concerned me most about going to school with him 
was that since he'd already established so many firm relationships 
I'd be branded as nothing more than "Tim's little sister." That's how 
it was at first, but eventually I had friends that didn't know him and 
when I talked with the ones that did, he wasn't the sole topic of 
conversation. 

So, I guess I am cutting loose. Slowly, I'm becoming my own 
person. I'm not as scared of that as I used to be. Who knows, maybe 
I can actually go a week without talking to my parents. Maybe one 
day I'll hear someone seriously ask, "Hey, aren't you Cathy's 
brother?" But now, I'm content where I am. That's not so bad, in fact 
it's pretty good. 




Tawanya 
Tracey 



Rodney 
Griffis 



Sonya 
Reese 




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Anne 


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Hugh 
Greene 



Photos bv Bob Cavin 




Susan 
McMillan 









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Angela 
Gibson 





Stephanie 
Koogler 







Amelia 
Kotlas 




Jacqueline 
Berry 





Emily 
Brady 





Jennifer 
Stadnicki 



Amy 
Ellis 





Kristin 
Worrell 



Tlie school year of 1989-19Q0 was a time of great 
jubilation in America over the events in Eastern Eu- 
rope. When we had left the previous year, the commu- 
nist wcirld continued to loom as the greatest percei\'ed 
threat ever to Western civilization, as it had for over 
forty years. When the school year of 1989-1990 began, 
there was a bizarre hole in the Iron Curtain. Poland 
had a non-communist President. And then, as the year 
progressed, one by one, the communist regimes of 
East Europe fell and were replaced by democratic governments. Each new week 
seemed to bring a report of another monumental change. When the Berlin Wall 
crumbled into sou\enirs, we were too shocked to rejoice. Each time, we thought, 
"It can't go further than this," and then the next week another communist gov- 
ernment would fall. 

And then it hit the So\iet Union. Lithuania declared its independence. Estonia 
announced plans to do the same. Free elections were held in Russia. By the end 
of the school year, Russia was announcing plans to leave the So\'iet Union. A 
red cloud lifted off the map, and the world became brighter. 

This year has been darker. The threat of war with Iracj has made the American 
mood more cynical, and has make us more prone to look for the underside of 
things. And the news from Eastern Europe has not been good. Reunification has 
left German\' with great debts. The economies of Poland and most other East 
European countries are in shambles. Romania is practically in Cixil War. Mikhail 
Gorbache\' is struggling to keep the Soviet Union together. Ethnic riwilries and 



Virginia 
Yip 




Krista 
Gilliam 




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Safrit 


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Byron 
MacDonald 



anti-Semitism are flaring all over East 
Europe. Communism had left, and 
chaos has arrived. 

But such pessimism is probably 
not warranted, at least in the long 
term. The world situation is dark right now, and 
probably will get darker in the next few years. How- 
ever, chaos naturally follows a complete breakdown 
of the social order, and then it is out of this chaos that 
new, better social order emerges. 

The lasting impression that the events in East 

Europe have left on the West is that monumental changes in the status quo can and 
do happen oxernight. The 80's left many Americans with the feeling that there was 
something not quite real about reality. If a war in the Middle East shocks Americans 



into action, the lessons learned from Eastern 
Europe could cause greater chaos and change 
here. 





Michelle 
Harris 




Christie 
Ayscue 



Cynthia 
Jolly 





Sherry 
Young 



Tamica 
Young 



The Gulf Crisis 





Matthew 
Reece 



Kimberly 
Havlena 



It is too easy not to care about what is happening 
in the Middle East if you are not close to someone who 
is o\'er there. Some of us at UNCG have acquaintances 
who are in Saudi Arabia, but most of us are not yet 
personally affected by the situation except by rising gas 
prices. 

This makes it hard for us to keep what is happen- 
ing in perspective. As of today, November 26, 1990 , 
there are about a quarter of a million American service- 
men in Saudi Arabia. Tlnat's 250 thousand people whose 
lives ha\'e been put on hold. 250 thousand people who 
ha\'e been sent to a different world, awa\' from their friends and their families, away from 
their dreams. 

These peoples' lives have been disrupted. I know a guy in the Reser\'es who had to 
drop out of UNCG this semester because he was stationed in the Middle East. His life has 
been thrown off track, and the lives of all those who love him. His parents, his fiancee, and 
his friends are having to learn how to live without him. 

It is easy for the rest of us to analyze the crisis from a cold political /economic 
perspecti\e. There is a lot at stake here. When the price of oil rises, the prices of everything 
shipped b\' truck or made out of petroleum rise. Many goods are shipped by truck, and 
petroleum is used to make lots of products, including svnthetic rubbers, plastics, polysty- 
rene (used to make stvrofoam), latex paints, perfumes, detergents, TNT, preser\'ati\es, a. 





Lisa 

Moore 





Marina 
Ciaffone 




Devona 
Whitsett 




Nichelle 
Montague 



T^^' ""^ aaspirin and phtirmaceuticals. Rising oil prices have a 

^t^ profound effect on our entire economy. 

^^^^B^^^^ But I do not believe war is the answer. I do not 

^^^^^^^^^ believe sending our troops to the Middle East is the 

^^^^^^^^^K answer. It is wrong for us to allow fellow Americans to 

be ripped from their homes and their lives to make life 

more convenient for us. We have known for a long time 

that we would have to find alternative fuels for oil. It 

will take a lot for us to survive increasing oil prices, but we must learn to do it. 

I saw a propaganda commercial for the army on TV a few days ago. The slogan of 

the commercial was "Freedom Isn't Free" . It was scary. I believe we are headed for war... 

Unless we have the guts and the brains to seek a solution that does not involve brutal 

force. Unless we are willing to pull together and beat rising oil prices, carpool, search for 

alternatives to gasoline and substitutes for petroleum products. 

It is easy to support the idea of war until it's your parent, vour child, vour boyfriend / 
girlfriend or you that gets shipped to a foreign land to be a killer, to sacrifice your life so 
America doesn't have to sweat a little. 



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BP.OTHE VKS Ai^d 

SISTERS. H€>| 






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Chris 
Templon 




SANITY AND INSANITY IN THE GULF CRISIS 



Well Mr. Bush, Congressmen, and Senators, I gi\'e you a an "A" for getting us into 
this mess, and an "F" for trying to get us out of it. The mess I am talking about starts with 
the Federal Deficit, with all the headache it is causing, and ends up on the issue of the Gulf 
Crisis, with all the lives it is going to cost. Gentlemen, just where do we stand in all this? 
Since these are the lives of our children we are sacrificing here, I would like to ask, "What 
is in it for us?" Defending democracy in the world, when we don't have it right here in 
our own country? Defending peace at a time when our Capital is called the murder capital 
of the world? What else? Sirs, 1 ask you to sit down, have a cup ofcoffee, put up your feet, 
and think about one thing: re-e\aluahng the US policy. We are not better off than than 
Saddam back in Baghdad. Ok, so you got to call him a madman, and had all those special 
shows about him on TV... clap, clap, clap. It does not mean a thing to me. I care about the 
millions of Americans out there who can't find a shelter for the night, those who don't know 
when thev will have their next meal. 

Don't get me wrong. Sirs. I do care about the people of the world, because they are 
all human beings: they breathe, eat, and live like all of us. But what 1 am confused about 
is why all this fuss about Kuwait, when Lebanon has been struggling with cixil war for 
seventeen years! In response our beloved government gave Israel the green light to invade 
Southern Lebanon? Whv all of a sudden this interest in what Saddam did to the Kurds, 
when "our best ally," Israel, massacred thousands of Palestinians in the refugee camps of 
Sabra and Shatella in 1982? And why was there such e\tensi\'e co\'erage and world uproar 
o\'er the Tianamen Square incident, while the Palestinians are being killed, maimed and 
tortured bv our ally? It just does not make sense. They are all human beings! Kuwaitis, 
Kurds, or Chinese do not have an extra leg or an arm that makes them special. I am not 
saving that it was right, but what is the difference? The answer, I figured after a lot of 
thought, is politics. Period. This goxernment does not care about anything except more 
influence in the world. It does not care about Americans, as much as it cares about Lebanese 
or Chinese people. 

If this government ga\'e a Yankee dime about people, social security, medicare, and 
education would not be on top of the list for cuts. Every time there is a problem, where does 



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Rolando 
Williams 




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Ashleigh 
Burr 



Randall 
Roberts 




the government turn to for cuts? And after that you wonder, Mr. President, why there 
are high school and college dropouts out there? You wonder, Mr. President, why we 
ha\'e such a high crime rate, drug rate... etc.? Well, if you didn't get it Mr. President... 
Then the Gulf Crisis comes up, and what do we do? We send our men to die. For 
what, I ask? The only answer I can come up with is the fact that our supply of oil is at stake. 
Oil ain't worth our men dying for. Saddam is definitely not going to drink it, so what's 
the deal? I cannot buy your defense, Mr. President, about defending the rights of 
humans — definitely not a dictatorship like the corrupt Kuwaiti family! Think abc^ut that 
Mr. President, and it is rude to call people names. 



-Mohammad Abdul-Rahim 




AT HOKE 






Chris 
Goldston 




Nicole 
Lurey 




Pamela 
Jones 




Kathryn 
Blake 





Jason 
Varge 




Karin 
Garner 




■■.^■r--'^m^- 



Michelle 
Stephens 




Penni 
Cobb 




OM SUPPORTS 
us TROOPS! 






Jennifer 
McElroy 




Stacey 
Webb 




Sean 
Stalls 



Gabrielle 
Jochnoivitz 



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Elizabeth 
Packarol 



Jeanine 
Petty 




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SecnuS^ ^ou rre without 

-{ fii VALUE 





j'O /S THf Ffvl'f\'At^rAL pi^llVLlPLi 





Cheryl 
Pint 



I came here to receive an excellent formal educa- 
tion in my interest field (history) and to be able to 
pass this knowledge on to my future students. 

John C. Skiscim 





To new students: Believe in yourself, if you do not, it will seem as though this 
is a major battle in your life. If you keep up your inner strength, things will 
run smoothly... I have just overcome what I thought would never end. Just 
imagine what I can do next! Look out Americia because here I come! 

Angela D. Drakeford 



'h^T IF VoU FOLIOU THIS SY^TEI^ 
To US LobiCPiL CoMCLUSIoN, 
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io\)K Voop^T ON THE 
Fi^^/i^rt /vlfNTflL PRl/^CIPLE' 
ITSELF 




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Jon-Maria 
Ramseu 






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Deborah 


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Peddycord 













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Rebecca 
Holloway 




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Sarah 
Kovac 


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Ashley 
McKaughan 



Michael 
Waters 








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Vi '^^ 



Christina 
Edwards 




Elizabeth 
Finch 





Korina 
Sanders 




Monica 
Pierce 



Susan 
Brown 



Amy 
Maurer 



Brian 
Blanch 




Virginia 
Rogers 













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Shastae 
Rich 


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Ken 
Stark 






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Christine 
Brown 




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My husband and three sons (all college graduates) tease me about having a 
higher GPA than they had. I love it. I am enjoying their support, respect and 
admiration. To new students: follow your own instincts and be true to yourself. 
Stand up for yourself; no one else will. 



Dolores K. Conner 



Dacia 
Wrenn 





T^*****<^ 







Keeley 
Neese 



Wendy 
Newton 




Sheila 
Wyont 




Brian 
Perry 



WvW 










Cheryl 
Junk 



Valerie 
Standland 



Kristen 
Difiore 




George 
Haire 



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1: 



Robert 
Fries 




Pattie 
Johnson 



Judy 
Versola 










Lora 
Nance 

Amy 
York 







Delane 
Frutiger 







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Lisa 
Hamrick 




Miclelle 
Virtue 



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Caroline 
Tanner 



Mary 
Vestol 





I came to UNCGjust to get an education, to get a job but I have learned a great 
deal about myself also. I would like to thank my mother Janice for continuous 
love and support. I love you, mom. 

Cheryl Clifton 




Lorinda 
McGildery 



Emily 
Harris 





Cynthia 
Allen 




Joanne 
Shooter 




The True Bond 




Bernard 
Hall 



Being a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma stM-ority on UNCG's campus is one of 
the greatest experiences in my life. I never imagined when I became a sister almost 
a vear ago that I would ha\e recei\'ed so many countless benefits. As a sister of Tri 
Sigma sorority, I am so thankful that I ha\'e the support of so many wonderful and 
unique people- my 44 sisters. 

Often, 1 ha\'e heard negative comments from people on campus about 
fraternity/sorority life. People say that these organizations do nothing but allow 
people to pay for friends. Well, every semester when my money is due to the 
sorority, I can honestly say that I know that I am not paying for any kind of 
friendship. The true bond of sisterly love is genuine and wholesome, not something 
that each of us is forced to have. The money that we all pay each semester only 
insures that our particular chapter can function financially as a sound group in the 
present and future times. 

Any organization, whether it is academically, socially, or community orien- 
tated, requires a fee for membership. Therefore, I personally feel that those people 
who say that fraternity /sorority members are paying for friends do not understand 
how much that bothers Greek organizations. Certainly, I am not saying that if you 
do not belong to any Greek organization you will not be able to live a fulfilling life, 
but I know that I would be missing out on a lot if I were not a member of Tri-Sigma. 

I am also sure that when I say I will be "missing out on a lot," some people 
mav immediately jump to the conclusion that I mean the social aspect of Greek life. 
I do enjoy the social events of my sorority very much because I know that no matter 
where I go I will always have one or more sisters by my side to make sure that we 
ha\'e safe fun. However, I have also learned a whole lot more in Tri-Sigma than how 
to have a good time. The sorority has given me a chance to show my strengths and 
improve on my weaknesses. I feel that I am a better communicator, more flexible and 
organized with my time, and definitely a more relaxed person. All in all, I feel that 



Margaret 
Hendricks 




Jermaine 
Collins 




Leanna 
Proctor 



Melissa 
Young 



1 am a more well- 
rounded person. 

I am not going 
to try to con\'ince 
anybody who could 
never see himself/ 
herself in a frater- 
nity/sorority to join 
one because I feel that 
as an individual each 
person should be 
able to find the place 
they fit in on a cam- 
pus and to be proud 
of that decision. 
However, UNCG 
has terrific fraterni- 
ties and sororities on 
campus. Brothers 
and sisters shouki 
not have to be sub- 
jected to so much 
negati\'e comments and attitudes just because a non-Greek person 
does not understand what a brotherhood or sisterhood is really all 
about. 

1 am not and have not ever been ashamed to tell anyone that 
I am a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority. I love all of my sisters 
and would be there for any one of them for any problem just as they 
would also support me. There is nothing negative about my soror- 
ity or any other Greek organization on this campus that 1 have ever 
observed. As the acting president of Tri-Sigma sorority, I have to 
work with many of my sisters on an indi\'idual basis. As a result, I 





Gwendolyn 
Pollock 



Donna 
Reid 







/ am here in order to aquire the skills necessary for the job situation 
I have chosen. Oh, and vote for Harvey Gantt. 

Steven W. Gardener 




Michelle 
Buie 





Deborah 
Reid 



can honestly say that I never met a more sincere, caring, and talented 
group of people in my life. I know that when I hear negative 
comments made about Greek organizations that whoever is making 
the comment is being much more subjecti\'e than objective. 

I sincerely hope that people on UNCG's campus will realize 
that these negative comments do not in an\' way lessen the bond of 
friendship and familv closeness among Greek brothers and sisters. 
Perhaps, if people would keep an open mind about Greeks in 
general, they would see that we have so much to offer to the campus. 
No one minds constructive criticism, but harsh words only deepen 
the gap of communication among campus organizations. If the fra- 
ternities/sororities on this campus are willing to be courteous, I only 
hope that others will give us the same respect in the future. Proper 
communication is the best way to have a healthy and comfortable 
college life. JUST TRY IT! 




Perry 
Bridgeman 




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Jennifer 
Barnhart 



Danielle 
Ward 




Jane 
Harke 



Bryan 
Weatherford 




Mayutni 
Fujita 




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New students: Do not give up quickly. I have 

really enjoyed my four years at UNCG and am 

grateful for all of the friends that I have made. 

Amy Rebecca Cheek 




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Cory 
Filer 








Michael 
Fasano 




Sabrina 
Thomas 



Alfonso 
Funderburk 




Elizabeth 
Tucker 




I t ^%i.. 



51 .J, 



/ came to UNCG to get an education so that I could become a teacher. However I have found so 

much more- wonderful friends, a great lifestyle, and most important a better "me". Make the 

most of every moment you are here- from the minute you start at UNCG. Time will pass too fast, 

and these are the best times of your life. 

Wendy L. Cheek 



Gwendolyn 
Morrison 




On Monumental Architecture 




When you think of Ancient Greece, the first xisual inidge that comes to mind 
is the Parthenon. It is the definitive symbol of the Greek value system, which is the 
cornerstone of modern Western Civilization. When you look at the Parthenon you 
don't just see the building, you are also aware of everything that its creators stood 
for. Good architecture has that power, to become a symbol and a rallying point for 
a culture or a people. The power of a symbol should not be underestimated. 
Common symbols make a community. 

But if you look into the history of the Parthenon a contradiction arises. During 
the Persian War the old Temple of Athena was destroyed. It was decided that a great 
new temple, the Parthenon, was to be built. The only problem was that Athens did 
not have enough of its own money for the project. The solution was to confiscate the 
treasury of their Athenian League allies. As you might expect, the rest of the 
Athenian League was not impressed. Sparta, the second strongest Greek City State 
and former ally, sacked Athens as a result. 

The Athenians had been known up until that point as trustworthy. They haci a 
remarkable reputation 
throughout the Eastern 
Mediterranean and were 
often called on to arbitrate 
disputes. Justice and fair- 
ness in international rela- 
tions were an integral part 

of the Athenian value W' --^1^^^ Jennifer 

system. It is ironic that in | ^ Ferrell 

order to build what would 





Sylvia 
Hayes 



Judy 
Versola 





Michelle 
Peel 



Selana 
Searles 





Michelle 
Holmes 




Melissa' 
Church 



become the symbol of their x'alue system, the Greeks betrayed its central principals. 

Monumental architecture always seems to have a checkered history, 
though. The pyramids did much to break the bank of ancient Egypt. Tlie economy 
of France didn't fare much better as Louis XIV built Versailles. The Shogun rulers 
of feudal Japan used the construction of massive castles to economically drain their 
vassal Daimyo. Either to secure their their present power or insure that their 
memorv will outlast their lifetime. Despots throughout history have known the 
power of architecture. 

There has been a lot of talk around campus this year about the Fountain. 
Some have taken notice that while two million dollars is being spent on a symbol 
for our University, the essence of the institution is being undercut by a budget 
scqueeze that has reduced the hours of the Library. Others have said that the money 
could have been better used on new facilities that would be functional rather than 
just esthetic. Manv complain that the decision to build was made in an authoritar- 
ian way bv the Chancellor, that they were not asked if the students wanted a 
fountain. 

The probable reason that students were not asked is that they would have 
said no. Indixidual students will only be here for a few years. By nature this makes 
their goals for the institution relatively short term. There is always something more 
pressing to spend money on than Monumental Architecture. It takes the vision of 
one man, not a committee, to conceive of grand ambitions. It take the centralized 
power of a despot, not a democrat, to see those plans through. The fountain is here, 
it is finished, and it is beautiful. Like all great monuments, the controversy over the 
Fountain's creation will die down o\'er time, but the structure will remain as the 
new symbol of our school. Symbols should not be underestimated. They hax'e a 
great power. Thev are important. 





Timothy 
Cripe 



Traci 
Crater 





Robert 
Carter 




Dana 
Jarrell 



Tanya 
Whedbee 




I'D BETTER r(\KE 
f\ SCAT, THIS IS (}0N(^ 
TO KEQUIRE SOME 
THOU&HT. 





NOV), I KAJOU THIS IS 
UJH(\T Z WAaJT, but 
I P\lSO K/VOUJ IT 
IS El/IL. 

6 



NO, ITS NOT ETVIL, IT'S TH& 
KlVOULEDCrE OF THE DIFFfREW^E 
BErbJ££-/V/ -- ^^ -" '^ 
&O0D AI^D 
E^yiL. 




THEY DISOBEYED AND 

LERRhJED 50N\ETHlWGr AlEvJ 
THAT LPT£R B£CaMe: A 
-pART OF TME 50(2 IE TV. 

N 






/ am here obviously to get an education. I am also here to have a good 
time and enlighten my way of thinking. UNCG was my first choice of 
schools and I've never regretted that decision. Bye! 

Kim Nicole Overton 




Kristine 
Anderson 



Lydia 
Cauthren 



STILL, I KAJOU THAT TO 
TAKE THIS Tm& IS BflE>. 
I WME ^Btbl T0Lt> 
I SHOULtJN'T 




iO THE S\N IS one: of 
DI^DBEDIENCE". OF NOT 
TRUSTlNlfr Tf^r^^s^ 

THOSE" UHO (CAfAE |/ " 

3£:fore v^u. r^ 



^ 




y£T So MftMV OF THr 
HERDS OF soc\£r\' hRE 
PEOPLE WHO DIP/VT 
TRUST THDSf flA;5urRS, 




TH£ So^IETV PiCCEFTS 7H£ 

'BENEFITS , SbT the: 

flPPLE" IS STIi-L 

FORBl DDE-IV. 




X^ 



THF LbSSOIV5 ARb 
CONTRP\DICT0f^V T<y TAyf 

EXfAMPLFS , A/JD THIS 

ISN'T CONSiD^f^Fi^ 

A PRo^LFrA- 




IT'S TusT THIS Sort 

OF pflRRDO)^ THPlT I'M 

HOPINO THI5 THING- 

UILL CLEAR UR 




"'■■-"^ 



H 


C/iapman 

Acree 


^■^ 
^ 














Cheryl 
Clinton 



Laura 
Kirkman 





Constance 
Wright 



Amy 
Johnson 




A Newlywed Perception 



iy^.j 



Khristin 
Potts 



If someone had told me before I came to college that I would be married at 
nineteen, I wouldn't have believed them. But here I am, one of the many married 
students on campus. It was a very odd and yet special feeling for me (being a 
newlywed) to look down in class today and see my wedding ring and band. I looked 
at the guy beside me and imagined him thinking, "Well, she's taken. " and I wondered 
if the girl beside me is envious, as I was my first three semesters here at UNCG 
whenever I encountered other women students who were wearing wedding bands. 
Then 1 happened to notice that the girl across the room is wearing an engagement ring. 
I wonder if her engagement will last, when the wedding is, and I sympathize with her 
because the memories of planning a wedding mid-semester are fresh in my mind . And 
then I stumbled across the question of my own marriage. Will it last? The statistics 
these days seem to indicate that I've married too young and will quickly be divorced. 
My husband and I even resolved, on New Year's, to survive through the first year of 
marriage. 

It's an odd thing, getting married. Two of my close friends and I were discuss- 
ing (just before Christmas) the necessity for the wedding ceremony and license. One 
friend \iewed the ceremony and license as a pointless ritual 
I and argued two people were married by their own personal 

commitment to the other and love for one another. I argued 
that weddings and license were a kind of public acknowledge- 
ment of marriage and are an integral part of all cultures and so- 
,^_______^_^^ defies. It is true, though, that true marriage is commitment and 

^^■l^- love between two people, not walking down the aisle or 

^H^^^^t signing a piece of paper. I remember when my younger sister 

^■^ S^Hl asked me after the wedding how it felt to be married. I think 

^H ^^R she was surprised when I responded "the same as before the 

^^L ^^^^H wedding". It's kind of like having a birthday. You know 

^^A ^^r^^ another year has passed but you don't really all of a sudden 

^(» ^ feel a year older. I felt just as married to my husband before the 

I ceremony as I did after. 



Antonia 
Locklear 



I'm great, I'm happy and thank God, I'm 
graduating... Whoopie! it's almost over. 

Jeffery L. Carrick 






Any 
Logemann 



Viria 
Killman 




Beth 
White 



Karin 
Lee 




Amy 
Lyons 




Alton 
Hughes III 





Mona 
Fisher 




Sylvia 
Duff 





A 





%^l 





Keith 
Ayscue 



ft 



Chancellor: Next time you plan policies for the campus such as the "wonderful" 
fountain, please consult the students first. We're the ones who have to live on 
campus. I would also beg the Chancellor to please do something about Mclver 
before it collapes on the students. 



Debora Ann Hill 





Kevin 
Griffin 




P 

^ 



Amy 
Petrine 





Jessica 
Goetzinger 



Stacey 
Shumate 







Allen 
Pless 




lam here to obtain an education and to learn to cope with many individuals which 
will enable me to survive in the business world. New students, I encourage you to 
strive for excellence in education in addition to becoming involved in your 
community through service. 

Michelle A. Huey 





/ at first came to UNCG because of its great School ofNursing. However, as 
the years have passed, I'v come to love UNCG for its great "old school" 
atmosphere and campus opportunities. I am glad I chose UNCG. 





No matter how tough it gets, strive to succeed in all you do... You don't 
have to finish school in four years to be good at your major. 

Geronda Cunningham 




/ am here to further my education, get a teaching degree and experi- 
ence college life. I encourage new students to get involved with campus 
activities. 



CamelaA. Caddell 



To Virgina Woolf 



Wendi 
Evans 




Chrissy 
Mitchell 




Well, Virginia, there is no Angel of oppressed womanhood guiding 
my pen. I am free, if not safe, to walk the streets after midnight and there is 
no man that I unwillingly slave for, father nor husband. I ha\'e the power to 
create women with this pen 1 hold and my image will mirror a reality you 
could only imagine. 

Yet I am bound by this coat I wear. No, it is not too small; rather it is 
oversized and swallows my frame. No, don't come closer yet. Tell me what 
you see. You say the coat is full, bright, beautiful and royal purple? Look 
again. What? Itisblackwith gaping holes? Come closer, hold the coat in your 
hands, examine the folds. Notice how it is like a patchwork quilt, so many 
colors spliced together, for this coat is Modernity and has no pattern. See how 
at one moment a hole is hidden in the folds and at the next it is filled but 
reappears elsewhere in the coat. Would it scare you to wear this ever- 
changing garment, always struggling tc^ keep the sleeves pushed up and the 
holes mended? 

So vou got up from your desk, laid vour pen down and killed this 
Angel? It was a long battle, you said. Then what? You abancioned your 
kitchen for your study and parlors, filled with the intelligentsia of your era. 
1 bet you thought you were safe, warm and well-clothed. Did you know you 
and those people were really at a cjuilting bee, each of you with needle and 
thread and cloth scraps left over from indixidual battles? Did you know that 
as you passed conversation and exchanged fish tales you occasionally dropped 
a stitch, forgot a necessary detail, miscut cloth and left out some pieces all 
together? Did none of you think to line this coat I wear, with flannel or some 
other warm cloth? 

Ah, what's this you say? You recognize that scrap on the right elbow. 
The Angel handed it to you as she sucked in her last breath? You thought it 
was a gift, a trophy? This scrap of freedom she handed you. This little piece 
of Modernity that was yours is red, stained with your own blood. This scrap 
of cloth, this freedom that you somehow thought meant ci\'ilization. You 
were bra\'e Virginia and I am grateful. You had courage, yet when vou saw 




Greg 
Farrand 



Marianne 
Gilsenan 




War on the horizon and learned 
that freedom is not civilization, \'ou 
could not face it. 

Alas, I ha\e .4 Room of Mi/ 
Own but somehow my room lacks 
the comfort of your study. Tell me 
Virginia, did Mr. VVoolf ever con- 
sider abandoning you, when you 
had your affair with Vita, perhaps? 
Did you know that fifty percent of 
todays marriages will end in di- 
vorce? Could you have been you 
without the support of the 
"Bloomsbury group" ? Did you 
know the average American will 
change jobs seven times? Do you 
know how much picking up and 
leaving that is ? As long as I wear 
this coat called Modernity I must 
chase the disjointed, unconnected 
pieces of the Modern dream that 
have a lot to do with freedom but I 
often wonder how civilized it all 
really is. 






Bob Calvin 






Pamela 
Pitchford 







Nicole 
Howard 





Melisa 
Williams 



Jennifer 
Jones 







Josette 
Glover 




Angela 
Cole 





Phi Mu, you have been my inspiration. Thank-you for all 
my memories, I'll miss you all. Mark, when I met you two 
years ago my life changed for the better. I fell in love with 
you... 

Kimberly Gatlin 





Jill 

Curtis 



M 


^\ 


Susan 


m 


''m 


Totten 


r 








/ hope to obtain a Bachelor's Degree in Economics and a minor in 
Sociology. 

Linda Gilliard 




^ 6 ■ 



James 
Blaylock II 



Steven 
Wicker 




Stefanie 
Clay 






Hayley 
Hollar 





Cornell 
Manning 



t 




Telisha 
Spencer 



Eddy 
Satterfield 







Anna Elise 
Medinger 



To new students: Strive to do your best to attain your goals and 
dreams. It is never too late to do anything you want that is within 
your heart... Always remember you must give much to receive much. 






/ am here to obtain a higher education and learn more about myself. I feel I have 
learned well at UNCG. To the Chancellor: Develop a better situation for 
Commuter Students: better parking, easier access, and easier to register. And 
new students: take your education seriously and learn from every new experience. 

Molly Harrington 




Phaedra 
Grove 




Angela 
Scott 




% ' / 



m^ 



John 
Cox 




Anne 
Weathersbee 



Tammy 
Quesinberry 




#1 




%-w 




^^•7' 






i ' * IL 


Kimberly 
Fearrington 

Randy 
McCrachen 

















Brent 
Munster 



^ 




Stephen 
Soliday 





^1^ 






#1 


JPNB 


Mina 




■^-^ 


Pathel 




mk 






Meredith 
Eskridge 


ii 




Jennifer 
McDevitt 




Rhesia 
Philip 




Denise 
Wheeler 





Sonya 
Black 




I woke up this morning to the sound of Pink 
Floyd's "Comfortably Numb" blaring from my clock 
radio. I stepped from my warm bed to my carpeted 
floor in the dorm room of my university. As I walked 
across the room, the DJ said "It's a balmy 27 degrees 
here in the Triad Area at 5:00 A.M." I shivered at the 
thought of going out into that weather this morning. 
1 put on my multi-lavered clothes and headed out. It 
was 5:45. A cold blast shot through my body as I 
stepped out into the dusky morning. 

My friends and I all piled into the car. We chattered 
about how cold it was, how hard it was to get out of 
bed and how little sleep we'd gotten the night before. 
Finallv we reached our destination. We all got out 
and walked into the building. It was barely warmer 
inside the Urban Ministries homeless shelter than it 
was outside. I walked past a few men in tattered coats 
to the kitchen, where several people had already gath- 
ered to make breakfast. After we'd finished prepar- 
ing the meal, I went back out to the main room. I sat 
down at a table with a man named Flavious, "It's a 
Roman name," he told me. We sat in silence for a 
while. "Sure is cold out there," I said, in effort to start 
a con\'ersation. "Not much colder than in here," he 
replied. More silence. "Are you one of those college 
kids?" he asked, after awhile. "I sure am." I said. "I 
used to be in college," he said, "But I had to quit when 
the money ran out." Suddenly I felt very guilty for 
ha\ing mv middle class life-style, and for how I woke 
up this morning. Why can I ha\'e such a great way of 
life when so many people don't e\'en have a place to 
call home? Fla\'ious continued talking, something 
about how he liked to go to Tate St. and see the college 



Kim 
Bellinger 






kids, how he thought they were so lucky. Then he said something I don't think I'll 
e\'er forget. "Cathy," he said, "I had a chance in college, but the Good Lord saw fit 
to put me here. I don't know why He did, but here I am. And 1 can live with it . The 
Lord provides for me. He gives me a place to sleep and food to eat, and tha t's all I need. 
As long as I live the way the Lord says and spread a little light, I'm happy. The Lord 
put you where you are, too girl. Make the most of it. Don't go feeling guilty for what 
you have, but use it for the right reasons." 

1 got back to my dorm about 8;30. I sat down on my bed. "Lord, thank you for these 
cox'ers , this carpet, these clothes and this University and for the balmy 27 degrees 
here in the Triad Area at 5:00 A.M. And Lord, thank vou for Flax'ious. Amen." 



Heather 
Souday 




Sara 
Smith 




Kimberly 
Ferrell 









Marianne 
Fagan 



Victor 
Maggio 





Ryan 
Weaver 



Carol 
Poole 





Heather Jo 
Christenhury 




Wendy 
Jessup 





In Transit 



I spend most of my life in transit. As an acti\'e student, 
that is what I do. I travel from point A to point B to point C 
to point D. Wliere ever I am and what ever I am doing, I 
always realize right in the middle of it that I have something 
else more important to do some where else. And so I go there, 
only to discover another task that will send me to yet another 
place. 

1 walk a lot. I walk to class. I walk to a place that I can 
do my homework. I walk to go eat. I walk to my office. I walk 
to get things for my employees. I walk to get administrators 
to sign papers. I walk to student meetings. I walk to meet 
with student leaders to conspire against the administration. 
I walk to visit friends. 1 walk to my room. My face and torso 
are fat, but my legs and hips are in great shape. 

I drive a lot. I drive to the mall. I drive to take my 
friends on errands. Idrive to get things for my employees. I 
drive to go to state-wide student meetings. I drive to visit my 
parents. I drive to get things from my old house. I drive to 
see movies. I drive to rent movies. I drive to return movies. 
I drive to parties. I drive drunk friends home from parties. I 
drive to campus. My car is not in great shape. 

I complain to my friends. I say, "I always go to see you. 
You never come to see me." My friends reply, "You're never 
there." My parents complain to me. They say that even 
though they have the number to my room, the number to my 
office, and the number to my friends' commune, excuse me, 
apartment, they can ne\'er get in touch with me. Wliere am 
I? In transit. 1 am going somewhere else. Or I am coming 
back. 

For a long while this worried me. I thought that it 
meant that I was not in control of my life. I was a rat running 
though a maze in an experiment being conducted by de- 
ranged researchers from the psychology department, the 
same ones who blind the cats. I had become the gopher of the 
student leadership. 

But then I began to notice some things. I noticed that 
I \olunteered to go get things for my employees, e\'en when 
they or other people could go get them. I noticed that I would 
waik across campus to relay information to people, rather 
than use the telephone. 1 noticed that I asked my friends if 




they needed rides. I noticed that when it was time to 
return, I would examine my neurons for any information 
that would send me on a mission somewhere else. I 
realized that I wanted to be in transit. And today I figured 
out why. 

I am a dreamer. 1 dream a lot. I dream about all of 
the things that I would like to do. And since I have spent 
so much time dreaming about what I want to do, I set out 
to do it. But then when I actually sit down to do it, I find 
that I would rather dream about doing something else. 
And that is my dilemma. I feel incompetent if I do not do 
all of the things that I dream about doing, but if I do things 
then I do not have time to dream. 

But travel is active. I am going somewhere, I am 
going to do something. And when you are traveling, you 
can not be anywhere else. And if are nowhere, you do not 
have to do anything. And if you do not have to do any- 
thing, you have time to dream. 

And so I spend my life in transit, going everywhere 
but being nowhere. Never doing anything by convincing 
myself that I have to go do something else. Giving myself 
time to dream by convincing myself that 1 am chasing mv 
dreams. 

Dreamer for hire. Have mind, will travel. (Please 
leave a message if I am not there.) 



Sherry 
England 





Montique 
Brooks 




Marivee 
Kearns 





student Legislative Assembly 



/ would like for Chancellor Moran to please consider more funding 

for the school ofH.E.S. At one time UNCG was known for their 

excellent H.E.S. but the department in whole does not have the high 

standards as in the past due to lack of funding. 

Elizabeth A Kerr 





Helena 
Holder 



To new students: Strive to do your best to attain your 

goals and dreams. It is never too late to do anything 

you want that is within your heart... Always remember 

you must give much to receive much. 

Shannon M. Oelcher 









WiM 



Vanessa 
Haygood 



To the Chancellor: Develop a better situation for 
Commuter Students: better parking, easier access, 
and easier to register. 

Kenneth M. Carter 




I have thoroughly enjoyed the five years I have spent at 
UNCG. I will cherish the memories and friends I have 
made forever. 

Lisa Michelle Farrar 




Psi Chi Honor Society in Psychology 




Wendy 
Jessup 




I CAN'T base: this decision 

ON/ Rl&HT AUD WRON&, BECMSi 

THE DECISION ITSELF MEaN? 

X CANT GRfiSPTWAT 




13UT TV£ QOl TO BRSr IT 

OV SOMETHIMG. THIS IS 
ORIG-IIVAL SIM, fl/vJC? I Hfll/r 

BEEN GIVEN THE UNIQUE 
OPPoRTUNiry 
TO PflRTlClPflTr. 




WHftT WOULD TWT BE LlKE^ 
WHO Ka^OUS, A/OBODY W/)S 

£VER GrOTTEN THROUG-H F{ 
UFETIfShE UlTHOUT 




\AY NEEDS m£ PROVIDED 

FOR /AMD IN RETURN J 

5UPPLV PiMUSEMENT 




'f^yp^n:^. 



So THIS, THEN, IS PAY 
ONLY REAL TlCKrr 
.OUT 






Allyson 
Camp 



Lisa 
Rosser 






Rebecca 
Stefan 



Bonnie 
Decoste 




WHI^H MEMQ 1 WOULD 

BE flLirfVATf£l 
FPOM MY 
PEERS. 




IF YOU CM I^EftUY 

Mf\HE: ft Peer, out of 

fl P^T. 




Bur, I DOA/'T HAV£ My 

VEERS DO 1? 




MERE'S TO 




JQ'CM 



I'M ALOA/£ /A/ MV WORLD, 
MD I'M JUST ft PET 
IN YOURS. 





Pamela 
Arnao 



Valerie 
Judge 





Dana 
Samuels 




Melanie 
Hodgin 



Jennifer 
Reep 




Nicole 
Kilpatrick 



Diane 
Cron 





Lissa 
Smith 






Molly 
Winkler 



KINKO'S 



W" Kinko's, the "copy place" is 

an extremely essential part of thie 
university curriculum. It profession- 
ally, as well as conveniently, pre- 
pares and publishes mass copies of 
important handbooks and packets 
needed to accompany ordinary 
texts for certain courses. 
Kinko's is a lifesaver for both students 
and faculty in more ways than one. 




Deangela 
Farrar 





Cheryl 
Moore 



SAV-WAY FOOD STORES 

BEST HOT DOG IN TOWN 

CecifS. Littfe 

•President 

4801 '71. ' ■l\'endoz'er J^venue 
Qreensbow, 'XfJ 24740 

(919) 299-6ti42 
(919) S52-h7S5 




TATE STREET 

Tate Street is probably 
one of thie busiest areas on 
UNCG's campus. Books, 
copies, cards, flowers, soft 
clrinl<s, pizza... Tate Street hias 
everything college students 
need. Somehow, somewhere 
there is that special something 
to meet a Spartan's students 
every wish. 

Tate Street is all about 
Spartan pride and Spartan 
happiness, 





Michele 
Keen 



Marlis 
Sisk 





SUBWAY 

Not enough time to go 
to the Cat and no money for o 
burger... stop end get a sub. 
Subway has the hot-and-spicy 
along with the cold-and-tasty . 
Subway is a place where stu- 
dents can get to know each 
other, catch a nutritious bite 
to eat, and get a few minutes 
away from it all. Subway is the 
place for Spartans. 



Nathaniel 
Durham 





David 
Masters 



■^- 



u 



Heath 
McCaskill 





ADDAM'S 



VISUAUIE 



WORLD 



PEACE 




Addam's Bookstore is not just 
an ordinary bookstore. It lias every- 
thiing and more. Along with a hiorde 
of othier basic necessities, it has the 
books you need at a price you can 
afford. Collegiate life is all about 
expenses and the average student 
needs a break. ..a financial break; 
and Addam's offers exactly that. 
Courteous employees, quick cus- 
tomer service, and discount prices... 
Adam's is all about the college stu- 
dent. 




Douglas 
Kilgore 



Kellianne 
Gibbons 






John 
Geouge 




Sfiaron L. %ti(i 

'D.'DS., 'S.A. 

ComjortabU 
J^amiti) (Dentistry 



800 'Ml Main St. 

Suite C 

jamestcmm, %C. 27282 

(919)454-3116 

Smile Jlqain! 



Donna 
Sexton 






Chandler 
Minton 



Polly 
Cogar 





NEW YORK PIZZA 

So you want a hot pizza and you want it fast. 
New York Pizza tias whiot you want and it is just 
around "the corner." Pepperoni, sausage, ham, 
peppers, onions, mushrooms, olives, and lots of 
cheese. 

Between every mindboggiing exam and distress- 
ing term paper the "normal" Spartan needs a 
pizza break. A university is not a university without 
pizza. New York Pizza is not too far and not too ex- 
pensive; and it has free delivery. Now that's what 
good pizza is all about. That's what college is all 
about. Pizza! Pizza! 





Rachelle 
Burke 



Martha 
Sugg 





/ would encourage all new students to go straight through college after high 
school. I would tell them not to wait a year; if they were ready for college to go 
on and graduate, because it is very hard to start back after you have stopped. 

Sharon Horner 




Rachel 
Wofford 





Commuter Students Association 



Kathy 
Moore 




I came to college to gain some knowledge. New 
students: give it all you 've got, especially at the 
beginning. 

Thomas G. Ferrell 




Neo-Black Society Choir 





Jerome 
Dickens 




It's never too late to follow your dream... Do the best 
you can the first time around. 

Kenneth J. Hux 




^ 



^ i 



n 



Kimberly 
Boyette 




A 



\ 




Holly 
Nielsen 



Kwanzaa 



Kwanzaa can be described as a cultural affirmation. A time for African- Americans to reflect upon 
their cultural heritage. The word Kwanzaa means "the first" or "the first fruits of the harvest" in east 
African language of Ki Swahili. Kwanzaa is observed from December 26 through January 1- Kwanzaa 
was founded in 1966 by Dr. Maulanl Karenga. It originated as a cultural idea and an expression of the 
nationalist US organizahon which was headed by Dr. Karenga. 

Kwanzaa is based on seven principles, known as Nguzo Saba. The principles are as follows: Umoja 
(unity); Kujichagulia (self-determination); Ujima (collective work and responsibility); Ujamaa (coopera- 
tive economics); Nia (purpose); Keumba (creativity) and Imani (faith). The Ki Swahili language is used 
because it is a non-tribal African language that encompassess a large portion of the African continent. 

The colors of Kwanzaa are Black- for the people; Red- for continuing struggle and bloodshed; Green- 
for youth and future building together. 

NBS had its annual celebration on Wednesday, December 5 in Cone Ballroom at 6 pm. The program 
was sponsored by the Cultural Committee and Student Services committee. The Mistresses of Ceremo- 
nies were Monica Ford and Cheryl Burgess. The program consisted of several readings, singing of the 
choir, a fashion show, drama scene, and dance. It was full of a variety of talents that were expressed by 
our youth. Afterwards, refreshments were served on African-American tradition of foods. The Kwan- 
zaa celebration was an event that everyone enjoyed. 




L. /. Notice: SUPRIES! Put your big pants on, we're big pants 
people. Jennifer cheats at road games. We're really living 
now. Skate Hockey; action packed entertainment. Michael is 
really my Mom. Peter called Uncle Albert, we're so sorry. A 
working class hero is something to be. 

Andrew Miller 






Jennifer 
Tinker 





j^- 




, /- ^ 


Dawn 


J^ ^-jt 


Stenson 


&jtk. 



Kerri 
Clark 




Jazz Interlude 






with 



In the Black 




Don't go home on weekends. Stay at UNCG and find some- 
thing to do on campus. Work at WUAG. 

Jim Shaughnessy 



Chris 
Clark 







in^ 




r*^r iSfc^ '^H 










^^HIV ^ 


JIB9 




TSiSSSfe, ' 



Zeta Phi Beta 



Angelica 
Inman 




Get involved! Don't sit in your room complaining. You 
can change the world- at least your part of it. Don't 
worry, be happy! 

Veranita Alvord 



You Can Choose A Ready Guide In Some Celestial Voice 

If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made A Choice 

You Can Choose From Phantom Fears And Kindness That Can Kill 

I Will Choose A Path That's Clear, I Will Choose Freewill 

Eric S. Massaux 




Samantha 
Sellers 




Pi Sigma Epsilon 





Kristen 
Harris 



I am here for two reasons, the first being to get an education in order to 

insure myself of a career. The second reason I am here is to learn 

through different experiences and be exposed to new ideas. 

Lizbeth Lynn Alexander 





Sheronda 
Harris 






Arlene 
Appollo 



Tami 
Johnson 





/ can easily say that my stay at UNCG has 
broadened my mind and opened my eyes. 

Desrie Nisbett 



Christi 
Howard 






Sam 
Turner 



^ 







Lynn 
Mitchell 




Alesa 
Stewart 





Deborah 
Wetzel 



New students, have fun; it goes by 
very fast. 

Abby Greeson 



Deborah 
Miller 




Much of the equipment in the Chemistry department is sadly old and out- 
dated. I appreciate the beauty of the campus as I walk to class but it's 
what's inside the building that most effects my learning. 

Connie Carothers 





I thank God, my husband, and my children for allowing 

me to receive my degree. 

Catherine Alexander 



^ 

^ 



/ came to UNCG because of its excellent elementary 
education program and because I really loved the lo- 
cation and feel of the campus. 

Leigh Morton 




Gamma Sigma Sigma 




Marc 






■ 


Morgan 








^^L^'^t^^i^ 


^^''*^- »«««.:. wa 


jI^b '^^ 


We need more parking spaces. 


i 


Jacqueline 
Cote 


W::'%' 


Mechele McNeely 








/ would like to thank God for his love, guidance 
and strength. I would like to thank my parents 
and family for their love and support. 

Beth Roberts 




Amy 
Pritchett 



Chi Omega 




Diana 
Alston 




Nicole 
Malachi 





Fate brought me here and I'm stressed like every other senior. 
Michael Howell 




Katherine 
Allen 






My advice to new students is not to get bogged down with your schoolwork. 
Although you're here to get an education find an effective balance between 
your studies and your social activities. 

Susan Lundy 




came here to achieve a Business degree in man- 
agement so that I can retire at age forty, and 
live at Myrtle Beach. 



Steven Brown 





Put serious effort into your studies but don't 
forget to have fun. 

Michelle Baron 





Chancellor Moran, talk to and be seen with the general 
student population. 

Ruth Petersen 



Melissa 
Parrish 





Trish 
Marr 





Kimberly 
Mehlich 




Jennifer 
Rosenbaum 





Ayres 
Fitzgerald 



Christina 
Hawley 




Graduation is Just a stepping stone for what lies ahead. But with God 
nothing shall be impossible; for, my best is yet to come. And, new stu- 
dents: Be influential, not influenced. 

Patricia Goode 




Laura 
Cox 



Chancellor Moran, spend more time on improving 

the food ill the Caf 
instead of building fountains. 

Lori Martin 



Karen 
Whetston 



Beth 
Larson 




Gina 
Freeman 




Melissa 
McKee 




Ivy 
Anderson 



New students need to study hard and be committed. 

Krista Yates 





Jonsie 
Ledford 



Francina 
Siders 



h^^^ 



Wesley Luther House 




Bonnie 
Price 




I'm doing just fine. Thank you for asking. 

Dionne Sills 





/ would advise new studies to take Com 106. It 
will help them in their studies and in their per- 
sonal lives. 

Gene Keenum 





Elmia 
Hodge 



University Catholic Center 



This school needs to stop wasting my educational "dollars" on 

worth- 
less ego-fueling architecture. Think. Don't give in to fratlsorority 
pressures.. Join Skate Club.. .Push things. 

Michael Crouch 





A football team would change the spirit of this school from one of a suitcase 
college to a fun-loving one. I have become a much wiser person not only 
from my classes but from the number of unique individuals I've met. 

Marianne Fajan 



Robin 
Lineberry 




Felisha 
Morrison 




I am at UNCG because the School of Nursing has given me 
the confidence I need to pursue a challenging career. 

Carol Buchanan 



Clara 
Osgood-Rhodes 



Wesley Luther House 



The smell of liome cooked food wafts through 

the sm.ill gmv house as the tables are being 

set up for dinner 

The mo\'ement of furniture and the coats 
piling up in the corner are signs of home 

BURSTING through the door 

people come 

the song of the screen door is stuck on 

ree-pee-eat-pee-eat-ree-pee-eat 

Smiling Chatting Laughing Hugging- 

Letting the guards down. 

A sigh- we sing: 

be present at our table Lord 

be here and everywhere adored 

bless these thy gifts and grant that we 

may feast in fellowship with thee 

We gather in this gray house 

to celebrate 

the union 

the coming together 

of our souls 

in time and space 

WELL- we don't have all the answers 

but 
WE SURE DO HAVE QUESTIONS— 

and friends and smiles and hugs and 

comfort in the discomfort of our struggles 

and a place to go 

where we can be ouselves 

with God 

and eachother. 




James 
Sands 





Jennifer 
Metcalf 




-Verinita 



Don't stress out over exams. You are worth no less if you get an "F" 

than an "A". 
Delight yourself in the Lord and He will give you the desires of 

your heart. 



Vihhi Bojarski 





I feel that UNCG has done a good job with education; 

however, the extra activities & most importantly the 

extra fees & their uses have much to be desired. 

Emily Gage 



Stacy 
Mangrum 




V\ ^ 



Mu Phi Epsilon 





/ am here to obtain a degree in elementary 
education. I enjoy the campus and profes- 
sors. 

Alison Lin Ayscue 












^ 




Don't come here expecting to do well 
without studying. 

Jamie Jo Jacobs 


P 
1^. 




Joseph 
Wolz 




M\\ II At. T 
Alpha PsI Omega 









Monica 
Sharpe 






^g^^i 


I made it to my Senior year and I feel 
good about my achievements here at 
UNCGreensboro. 

Patricia Bowling 


C'^ 
















Sarah 
Brown 





Rita 
Hinson 



I belitne that it is Good 
To serve God 
By serving Others 
To serve myself is evil 

I believe that it is Good 
To sing in Harmony 
With the World 
To sing alone is e\'il 

1 believe that it is Good 
To live in Peace 
With mv Fellow Man 
To rock the boat is e\'il 

I beliexe that it is Good 
To ha\'e Faith 
In God 

My Parents 

Church 

School 

Mv Communitv 

My Race 

My Class 

The Party 

My Sex 

America 

Authority 

Humanity 
To think for myself is e\il 

1 believe that it is Good 

To believe what They say is Good 




Mark 
Queen 




Believe That it is Good 




Eddie 
Manuel 



Yolanda 
Anderson 



Lisa 
Smith 






Vm here to procrastinate making further decisions 
about where I want to be. (Wasting time is a very 
important part of my life.) 

Marjorie McKelvy 



Sandra 
Rhyne 





Catherine 
McFadden 




Residence Hall Association 




/ am here to fulfill my desire to become a nurse. 
The "G" has a good nursing school and as a whole 
the system is not too large or impersonal. 

Christa Faour 



/ would like to see specialized parking for upper- 
classmen who have off-campus internships. 

Ashley A. Woody 




Emily 
Pitts 




c 


1 


I 



Residence Hall Association 




Sandra 
Burwell 



This is a university full of students who are 
people, not a school full of politics. 

Deborah L. James 





If you can imagine something you can achieve it. If 
you dream of it you can become it. 

Kelli Jackson 



Angela 
Smith 






% 


^S - 


■■' mf^ 






9'-: 




Heather 
Palombi 





Doug 
Kim 



Jennifer 
Scarborough 







William 
Farrar 




Gretchen 
Robinson 



Beverly 
Florence 



I'm sure if I had heard it, 
it would have been funny. 

Santantha 
Roddy 




Steven 
Currie 





Daniel 
McEachern 





Parry 
Graham 



Jacqueline 
Wilson 




Freedom from insecurities is acquired from the security of 

believing in one-self. 

Laurie Crider 





Tim 
Seats 




I am stressed.'! Frantic!! Get a fountain in front 
of your house- would you? Outta here NOW!! 
Thank God!!! 

Kimberly Jeffers 



An education is important, not only to make more money, hut to make a 
complete person. I feel UNCG has given me insight to who I am and how to 

deal more effectively with people. 

Leah McGlamery 




Melinda 
Pearce 





/ never thought it would end this way, 
the lights, the sounds, the color... 

Charles Upehurch 




Stephanie 
Reavis 



Students United for Campus Ministries 





Ethan 
Boylan 




William 
Price 




canie to get educated, among other things! Fm 

doing great! "Remember that I'll be there for 

you... These five words I swear to you!" 

John Scott O'Donnell 



Mary 

Kathleen 

Bobzien 



International Students Association 




Shelley 
Mathis 




Laura 
McCarthur 




/ am here to learn as much as I can about educating 
children. I loved college. I had a wonderful time, but I'm 
ready to move on. 

Jennifer Abbey 



Tomiha 
Small 



Amy 
Arrington 






Paula 
DeHart 




Latonja 
Boykin 



Schyuler 
Barbour 










Trina 
Propst 



Wendy 
Newcomer 





I'm here to get an education in life as well as academically. My goal is 
to be receptive to the problems facing students. To freshmen: It's rough 
going at first, but get your priorities in perspective and you'll do fine. 

Jeff Richards 





\m 



Vicki 
Reynolds 




Stephen 
Gardner 



Susan 



Meredith 
Eskridge 




-fi 




Angelina 
Smith 





Bettie 
Mauney 



I would like to say that my four years at UNCG have been both enjoyable 

and fulfilling . Not only did I get an excellent education but I also learned 

about professionalism, thanks to UNCG and Kappa Alpha Psi. 

Dwayne Campbell 





UNCG has been a great place to attend. I 
wouldn't trade my college experience for any- 
thing in the world. 

Pamela Davis 



Mitzi 
Sechrest 





Staurt 
McCall 





Neo-Black Society 

Executive Board 



New students at UNCG should begin their education with a 
positive attitude and do the best they can to get the most of 
their education. 

Jennifer Greeson 



/ am finally out of here. 
Rachel Leonard 



Attorney General's Office 





Richie 
Manuel 





I came to college because it was the thing to do- not because I 
knew what I wanted to be when I grew up. I'm still not sure if I 

know that yet! 

Caroline Rhodes 





Lisa 
Robinson 



Ronnie 
Stokes 




m^ 




Adele 
James 



Priscilla 
Wallington 




Camille 
Billops 




Kimberly 
White 




I've been here enough (my four years) and I'm ready to go. 
Grelynn Bradley 



Vm here to refine the talents I have as well as discover new ones. 
Thanks to everyone in the art department, teachers and students, who 
helped in these discoveries. To Chacellor Moran - You can build more 

with students than you can with bricks. 

Edward Fields 






Mirza 
Baig 




Karen 
Lebel 



New students. Try and decide on your major as early as pos- 
sible, and don't wait until your last year to take the hard 

classes. 



Kristin 
Batten 



Lisa T. Lard 





ffW. 



ji Although my grades have not been the best throughout my 
\ 'i four years at UNCG, I have learned a lot more about life, 
and myself, than I ever anticipated. 

^ Gayle Denise Stone 



if V«^ m 



Jeffrey 
McKeoivn 




Nurse's Christian Fellowship 





Randy 
Rogers 




% ^ 

^ly 



Dan 
Maker 




Leslie 
Goodman 



Melody 
Marks 




Association of Nursing Students 




Lillian 
Kupit 




Linda 
Chiwona 







To new students, I would advise involvement in 
campus activities and organizations. 

Melissa C. Robinson 








Manuel 
Dudley 








p 






"1 -- 

1 ' " 




Amy 
Henderson 


M^'^ 












Katie 
Davis 




Tricia 
Rentz 




Katherine 
Wilson 



Meloni 
Hinnant 




^^yt^^ 



l^ 



William 
Barfield 



\ 



Stephen 
Jones 



Carla 
Young 




TJ 
Filipowicz 




Teresa 
Steele 



David 
Vestal 



/*~N 






T^j 


1 


Susan 
Wallace 


^ 


J 









HF /L- ^Bj 


Johanna 
Lynam 








Who do I Think I am? When it comes to who I am, it 

requires no thought. I am that I am by the Grace of 

God which was not bestowed upon me in vain. 

Cora Elaine Harper 




/ advise new students to set constant goals throughout their 

college careers. Do their very best, strive for excellence, and 

remember that after college, reality begins. 

Gynevella Michelle Ballard 



Keely 
Viggers 





North Carolina Student Legislature 




Regina 
Vick 



Tamara 
Turner 




^^/m. 


Dana 


i ■' 


Bays 


M 





Cristall 
Johnson 




North Carolina Student Legislature 





/ would advise new students to be open to new ideas 
and new experiences; you only go to college once! 

Sherry Blevins 



Beth 
Milam 





My advice to new students is to forget what they thought college 
would be like because it's not at all like what you would expect. This 
applies to both positive and negative aspects. 

Julia Marie Johnson 




Sue 
Skipper 




Angela 
Revercomb 



Jennifer 
Loosemore 






Catherine 
Somers 



David 
Galbraith 




\ 



6li 



New students: Get involved! This university is only 
as alive as its students. 

Juliann Finch 



Annette 
Cameron 




X'^ 





Alexander 
Lewis 






Thomas 
Reeves 


■a 




Christina 
Ulosevich 


Robert 
Racz 





mM 




Joanna 
Poupard 



Rodney 
Garner 



Meredith 
Clifton 




Amy 
Harwell 





Manage your time wisely, take every opportunity to 
make the best of your four years here. 

Angela Lanier 



Amy 
Brown 



^ 



Li- 



Joe 
Haithcox 



i 




Knowledge is the only thing that no one can take away 

from you. Believe in yourself and believe in God and you 

will be the best you can possibly be. 

Piper Corie Yates 






John 
Bonitz 




Amanda 
Scott 





Wanda * 
Williams 



Jennifer 
Moore 





/ would like to wish all my sorors and future sorors of 
the Omega Nu Chapter ofZeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. 
much success. Z - Phi!! 

Shannon D. Chavis 



Thoughts from a Fishbowl 

I was twenty when I realized 1 lived in a fishbowl. Twenty years old, too young to be regretful and 
too old to be flippant. It is profound for me to read a newspaper, for I always feel that I am peering 
deep into the recesses of the world, something that only a privileged few can do. But when I read 
a newspaper, I never fail to feel something flat and glossy smooth, cool and invisible bounce 
against my nose and forehead. Like a tropical fish exploring its world and coming to the side of 
its fishbowl, I jump back, startled, concerned, and cornered. 1 return to my paper, and again, I run 
into those walls that 1 can not see. 

I fold my paper and think about how contained my world is. Two minutes ago, before I hit the 
edge, I was educated, insightful and perceptive. One minute ago, I popped my zipper, for I was 
too big for my pants. Now, I sag under the weight of a world I don't understand. 

Absurd, isn't it, my ignorance being my gills. Now my lungs fill with something unfamiliar and 
I wonder if my role in mv fishbowl world is one of the exciting, exotic fish, or the ugly, algae eater. 

The exotic flsh is beautiful, has beautiful flsh friends, eats beautiful flsh food, and li\es in a 
beautiful fishbowl world. It swims around, casually poking into the corners of the world, needing 
only frequent feeding and cleaning. Its primary role is in entertaining and pleasing THEM. 




Cheshire 
Cole 



John 
Smith 




The adx'antages of being the exotic fish are the unquestioning contentment, 
and dependable, never-ending care given to it. However, being the exotic 
fish is something of a prostitution of its existence. It swims around casually 
swaying its tail back and forth in the sensual motion that is so natural to it, 
much to the delight of THEM. Anytime it butts ungracefully into the walls 
of its containment, it swims away blushing and beautiful. The beautiful 
exotic fish is an intellectual sacrifice. 

On the other hand, the ugly algae-eater is latched on to the walls and tries 
to suck its way through the muck and grunge, cleaning up the fishbowl as 
it goes. Unfortunately, it is not very popular, for it is trying to liberate, and 
it is lonely. The fishbowl needs the algae-eater, but hates that it is a constant 
reminder of the maintenance of the world, maintenance that makes the 
exotic fish feel guilty and defensive. It is seen but ignored, and hence hin- 
dered. Sometimes, the algae-eater is remoxed. THEY quietly pluck it out, 
kill it, or reduce it in size through purging. 

Perhaps neither is my role, for I am too restless to be exotic, and too cow- 
ardly to be ugly. I am more of a frightened vigilante fish. One that swims 
and swims and continually butts heads with the wall that I can not see, 
swimming crazy and quick from wall to wall, corner to corner, edge to edge 
until I discover a hole, break in the system, a way around my distortion glass 
so that I can see, really see. 1 discover that if I start at the bottom and swim 
as hard as I can towards the skies, I can catapult myself out of my world, my 
security, into THE WORLD. And I do not like it. 

It is unfamiliar and strange. Only experiencing it is understanding it . A 
newspaper every day, a college diploma, and a trip to the beach every year 



Sarah 
Hills 




I would advise new students to do their best 
and strive hard to achieve all of their goals. 

Rhonda Johnson 





Tracey 
Thompson 



Kimberly 
Shifflett 




only reinforces the illusion. 

So, 1 di\'e back into the mainstream and soon forget my day's thoughts. I 
forget and, in doing so, I am safe and sane, gaily swimming from one seem- 
ingly interesting point to another. 

But what sets me apart from the other fish with me is that 1 am a coward. I 
glimpsed for a brief moment, what it means to see honestly, really see without 
the distortion of my fishbowl and I recoiled. 



Maria 
Greene 




Now, when I read the paper, 1 feel that cool slick surface on my cheek, and I 
ha\'e bad dreams. And in my dream, there is a painter sitting before his mas- 
terpiece. 

The painting portrays a young lady, slim, in a violet silk suit with dark hair, 
shoulder length, standing in a pair of awkward high heels, with her back to us, 
a little left of center. She is standing in a deep purple-blue sea with a green 
\elvet armchair a little to her right, with a light shining from behind. There 
is a little, absurd, green frog sitting causally next to the young lady's briefcase. 
On the top half of the painting, above all of this, is a big tropical fish, orange 
and white, rushing towards me and past my heroine, lea\'ing a tormented, 
frenzied path of big, crystalline bubbles in its wake. 




Don't expect too much, and expect the unexpected. Peace on 
Earth. 

Scott Poole 





Stay focused with school work, but get involved 
with activities. 

John Barrett 








Brent 
Peters 




^^ ;jk m^^Ki-^ 







FS^'^p^J 



Ladonna 
Watkins 








My advice to new students is: Don't take as long to 

graduate as I have. 

Christy Key 





Sarah 
Newsotne 




Kimherly 
Knowles 





t 




Atiba 
Bethea 





Laura 
Needham 



Cristy 
Bridges 





Jennifer 
Russell 



I would like to say that out of my four years at UNCG, I've run 

across one good professor who taught me more than any other 

professor. She teaches Textile Economics. 

George Ray Shelton, Jr. 



a 



V 




^^ ji 




f^» 



mM 



Andrew 
Downs 




Amy 
Habegger 





Denise 
Melvin 



The Skate Club 

I was skating to work through campus today and was slowly approaching 
a woman from behind. Hearing my approach, she promptly began sidestepping, 
seemingly right and left simultaneously. As I passed to her left, she muttered 
(loud enough for me to hear, from several feet away), "That's dangerous!" I think 
not. Fractured bones, life-long scars. Tattoos, week-long drunkenness. Skate- 
board Hockey, blood. Road Rash, Police harassment. Teen-aged Skate Bettys, Ear- 
splitting Thrashing tunes: And all that was just last Friday at Jessica's Skate Club 
party. Danger? 

I'd seen it all. So who's this High and Mighty, straight-laced, tight-ass to 
say her spastic response to my mode of transportation and push her own 
insecurities off on me, like it's my fault and I should be responsible for her well- 
being? Think! Push things! Be right! 

- Michael V. Crouch 
Skate Club 



Kathleen 
Mahony 




^^^^ 




UNCG has provided me with a great learning opportu- 
nity, not only about the courses offered but about myself 
and everything around me. 

Kimberly Jayne Boozer 



Yvette 
Colbert 



/ would like to say that I'm saddened to leave UNCG but I feel confident about the 
education that I have learned here and would like to say thanks to every single 
friend I've made here at the "G," you have made my four years so enjoyable. God 

Bless the Boys of Bailey! 

John Barbee 




Mt 



The Coraddi 



CORADDI is now in its '^3rd year of largely continuous publication. It began in 1897 as the STATE 
NORMAL MAGAZINE. Newsy at first, it grew to accommodate more and more literary material, 
during the twenties, it became obvious that the main focus was literature. And the State Normal School 
became the Women's College. So the name changed to CORADDI. many people ask what a name such 
as that could mean... well, it's an amalgamation of the three literary societies existent at that time: 
COnelian, ADelphian, and DIkean (really). 

Wliat's changed? Probably everything but who am I to say? Ed itors come and go — they're like birdcage 
liners. I don't know how many there have been here. Doesn't mater. At least we don't have to advertise, 
as they did until quite recentlv. We are supported bv your student activity fees, and we are all for free. 
Stylistically running exervthing. Tight 50s functionalism, genral hangingout 70s slacks adn bellbotoms. 
80s whate\'er. 90s?, bury hack ultramod pretensionsness. In fact I order you to burn all issues fo 
CORADDI you own. Show us your papers. SUBMIT DON'T BE SCARED it's not evern art. room 205 
EUC, 334 5572. Dvid Andrew, editor. Stephanie Wright, actual brain. Evan "D" Smith, literature. Jim 
Counts, art. Christina Ulosevich, typing. Everybody else know who they are. Chewing girls and boys, 
spiting them out. 



-D. A. 




La Tonja 
Watford 




Mario 
Singleton 





: -^fdfaA. ■ -'■». 



im 



I will always treasure my experiences as a student at UNCG. I would not trade 
them for anything. My memories of new friends will alwaysbe cherished. I have 
learned so much and have become a new and different person. 

Michelle Nicole Roache 



Alisa 
Laws 




<^-'\ 




Edythe 
Kennedy 




The Kaleidoscope 





Natalie 
Taylor 




Good bye to my Fraternity brothers in Phi Beta Sigma 
Fraternity, Inc., it's been real. Blu...Phi... Spr.88 #4 Gar. 

Jonathan F. White 



My advice to new students is to work hard whether 
you like your classes or not. 

Mary Katherine Lingerfelt 




.Our Video Yearbook 



Paulleatha 
Bruce 





Jennifer 
McKeel 






Susan 
Seaver 




Education is the key to success. 
Robert Lloyd 



I'm here to find my final fulfillment and to discover new frontiers. I'm doing 

well.... better, thankyou. I say to new students, "one thing leads to another" 

and you've already made the big mistake.... you're shoes are untied. 

Kelly O'Beirne 



Ingrid 
Brown 




April 
McCollum 





Joann 
McDowell 



Neo-BlQck 

Society Dance 

Troupe 





Meredith 
Parrish 



PEACE JOY LOVE and HAPPINESS... 
Kelly Freeman 




Daniel 
Welch 







^ Christy 
Garcia 



Neo-Black 

Society Dance 

Troupe 




Monika 
Morse 




Neo- Black Society Drama Troop 



Heidi 
Hantho 





Jenifer 
Josey 




Lamberth 




Nathan 
Williams 





Tonya 
Williamson 



Gregory 
Monroy 




Take Back the Night 



Sexual assault has to be one of the most degrading things that 
can happen to a woman. To have someone disregard your value 
as a person, and take something so special from you is unfair. But 
the worst thing is that so often the victim is too ashamed to admit 
that she has been violated. Not only is she brutalized and made 
to feel like garbage, but she is also made to feel like it was her fault. 
"You wanted it. Why else would you have dresseci liked that?"... 
"You teased me too much, I couldn't help it." The truth is, a 
person never forfeits the control of her own body. Too many 

times, a woman feels like she is the only one who has ever been sexually assaulted. In 
actuality, thousands of women are victimized in this way each year. 

In order to raise awareness of this fact, Wednesday, October 3, Women's Connenchon 
held its annual Take Back The Night march and vigil on the UNCG campus. The march 
began behind the Elliot University Center and proceeded around the campus until it 
circled to the front of the EUC. Approximately 75 candle-bearers participated in the 
march. 

Maybe, through the attention put on sexual assault by Take Back The Night and the 
many other programs geared toward awareness of this crime, people will think twice 

before they take a late night jog or invite someone to 
their room, whom they barely know. I wish so much 
it didn't have to be like that, that I could feel safe 
enough to take a walk at night by myself. It is sad that 
safety causes me to miss out on some of the beautiful 
things in life. 



Lashawn 
Hewitt 





I have a feeling that none of us will figure 
out exactly why we are at college until long 
after we've left. 

Heather Patricia Lankford 



Andrea 
Jones 




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Sandra 
Ryals 




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NAACP 



Whenever I get confused about what I want to do with my life 

and where my priorities are, I think about an old Led Zepplin 

lyric: "/ live for my dreams, and a pocket full of gold." 

Shayne Weyker 







My classes are fun this year since it's my Senior 
year. I'm looking forward to graduation. 

Wendy L. Holland 



Wendeline 
Sisk 








/ would advise new students to enjoy college but 
to keep in mind the real reason that theyVe here. 

Felicia Gay Fisher 





Jennifer 
Reep 





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I came to UNCG to advance my knowledge in the area of education, 
and in the process made friends that I will have for a lifetime. 
Susan, Ashley and Kendal thanks for being there... I know our 
friendship will last. 

Steven Edwards 



Environmental Awareness Foundation 





Jacqueline 
Kenivorthy 




The Environmental Awareness Foundation 




Miriam 
Jolly 




The En\ironmental Awareness Foundation (EAF) is a group of stu- 
dents and faculty dedicated to conservation, recycling and the preservation 
of natural resources. Last vear they recycled more than twenty-five tons od 
aluminum, glass, plastic, steel and paper. 

This year thev began a project labeled Adopt-A-Building. Under this 
project, \arious organizations on campus are responsible for emptying 
recycling bins from chosen buildings. In return EAF provides publicity (on 
the recvcling bins) for the organizations. 

Earlier this vear EAF held an inaugural ceremony for the recycling 
garage located at 529 Highland Avenue. The first can was throw^n into the 
bin bv Chancellor Moran to show his support for the project. Chancellor 
Moran also helped with the formation of the En\'iornmental Action and 
Advisory Committee which will consider en\'ironmental issues concerning 
UNCG and explore solutions. 

The EAF chapter at UNCG also attended the National Conference for 
the EAF in Illinois. 



Angela 
Leonard 



Christina 
Parnell 






Phalicia 
McCraw 



Sharon 
Thompson 





/ came to UNCG because I believed UNCG would be a good 
school to finish my degree, now that I am almost finished, I 
believe UNCG was the right choice. 

Ralph Rowe 




Jennifer 
Garrett 



The Begining of the End 



There is sometliing remarkable about not showering until 1 1 :30am; about lying in bed 
and sunlight streaming through the window. There is something remarkable about skipping 
classes and taking a holiday simply for one's sanity. 1 skipped English, and it is my major, but 
since I saw Hamlet last night- it seems a fair compromise. Besides when Fall came this year, 
I realized that summers (and many other things) are not infinite, as I thought they would 
always be. And that the chance to see Hamlet die in Horatio's arms, while sitting next to my 
best friend, may nex'er come again. There are miles between us now and next year there may 
be states. 

It seems I am more careful than 1 used to be to enjoy myself, especially in situations that 
cannot be altered. "Time is fleeting" is no longer an empty cliche'. It is not time that rushes 
by me but it is moments. 1 know that my dinner table will be (before I am ready) transformed, 
not into something dreaded but simply something different and I cling to the present, wanting 
to "suck the marrow from life". (Is that the way Robin Williams said it in Dead Poets' Society?) 

So, it is not that I li\'e my life in a sentimental sadness knowing that e\en the happiest 
moments will end or in a forced pleasure because it is the most efficient use of m\' time but 
that I glory in e\erv moment simph' because it is a part of m\' humanity. 




Sina 
Pipkin 



Amy 
Johnson 





Latonya 
Woods 





Ashley 
Yates 



^- 






I came because (surprise) I was on a waiting list at Carolina. I 
don't regret that- It's been a fantabulous four years. Morn, Papa 
Jarriet- 1 love you all. Thanks to the English and History facul- 
ties- you really taught me a lot. 

Angela Ann Rice 





Devonna 
Kitnrey 





Shannon 
Oakley 




Brandy 
Hobson 




Melissa 
Mills 



Stephanie 
Mills 





Kim 
Kazmierczak 




Devin 
Hamilton 







St&:\t 



Tracy 
Johnson 



Stacy 
Shepherd 




/ attended UNCG because I felt it offered me a quality education, and an oppor- 
tunity to enrich my life. My education is one of my most prized possessions that 
I have obtained in my life. It has been a long, hard road, but what's worth hav- 
ing is worth working for. I consider myself fortunate to have obtained a quality 

education. 



Kimberly Dawn Hobbs 



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Carolyn 
Steed 




The Physical Education Major here at UNCG brought me to North Carolina. Now \ 
thatVm here, I feel I could not have made a better choice in universities. The people i 
I've met at UNCG are helpful, considerate and especially friendly. Tennis team. 
Alpha Delta Pi, and friends have given me memories I will never forget and for my 
last words... Mom, Dad and Jon, I love you! 

Kristin Luanne Sandburg 




THANK YOU 

FOh >'uPPING 
OUR .•^L^^-- . 






To new students: get involved right away in as many activi- 
ties that interest you as possible and study, study, study. I 
have had some great times here; I only hope medical school 
will be this much fun! (Ha) 

Mendi Peterson 



To new students: don't eat the food!.... 
God help me. 

Catherine E. Forrest 






■Hi ^> ^-^ 






Angela 
Bowen 



Jennifer 
Miller 





Regina 
Perry 



Wendi 
Owens 






Sandra 
Ryals 



Shaye 
Kidd 







Jennifer 
Johnson 




Stacey 
Champion 




Janet 
Paith 




r^: 







I've enjoyed being at UNCG. I think that the 
school is really growing and is one of the best 
in the state. 

Kenneth English Rotan 



David Mclnnis 




If you will think; they will teach you. If you 
continue to think, you may find your own 
way better than anyone can show you. 

Joe Morgan 




Lynda 
Brown 



Lisa 
Devine 





Pamela 
Cote 




Steve 
Caporelli 



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Dana 
Dooley 



Merkeitha 
Stanley 





Andrea 
Walser 



An Education that Fits 



I am sitting liere on tlie outskirts of the food court in tlie mall. I just consumed a huge meal, and 
I need to rest. I have finished most of my shopping, with the exception of things I have on order. But they 
will not be ready for a while , and so I have time to rest. 

This shopping excursion has taken cjuite a long time. When I first arrixed here, I did not 
underestimate how difficult it would be. In fact, it seems to ha\'e been a bit easier than I had expected. 
Where I went wrong was in expecting it to be simpler than it actuallv turned out to be. That's not to say 
that 1 expected it to be simple. I had just not realized how complicated it would be. 

I came here looking for the outfit that 1 am going to v\'ear to the opening. I had a clear idea of the 
image that I wanted to assume, so 1 went straight to the directory and picked out all of the stores that I 
thought would need to go to. 

My first stop was a huge success. I went to Banana Republic looking for a shirt, and not onlv found 
one that was perfect for the opening, but also two others that I thought would be great with the rest of 
the outht 1 had in mind. I o\erheared some other people complaining that the store did not li\e up to 
their expectations, but it was perfect for me. 

Next 1 wanted a leather jacket. Thus, I went to the store with the perfect name. Leather Express. 
I was completelv disappointed. My idea of a leather jacket was something functional and fashionable 
with a bit of a swashbuckling flair. Their idea of a leather jacket was something out of a seventies biker 
flick. Personally, I am ashamed to admit that I know what leather jackets in sexenties biker flicks look 
like. I immediately turned around and left. For a while I e\en considered not getting a jacket to go with 




Tracy 
Little 



Leigh 
Jolley 






Jennifer 
Zsanibecky 



Barbara 
Grospiron 



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the outfit. 

Next I went to Ace of Spades looking for a pair of pants. I ended up being more disappointed with 
them than I probably should have. Mainly I was just pissed off. I found a pair of pants that went well 
with the outfit but they did not fit as well as I wanted. After I paid for the pants, I asked about alterations, 
and they were going to charge me as much for the alterations as the pants themselves cost. I left in a huff. 
Later, I was walking past Avitto and saw a sign advertising cheap alterations. So I went in, and they 
quoted me a very reasonable price and said that it would be done by the end of the day. Although I usually 

think of Avitto as being too new wave for 
me, as 1 looked around the store 1 realized 
that 1 liked their stuff better than Ace of 
Spades. Next time I plan to go to Avitto 
first. 

I got to thinking that instead of a 
leather jacket, I might go for a wool jacket, 
or maybe a sweater, possibly with an out- 
doors feel. I found a place called Woocis. It 
was not the type of place that I had thought 
that I would look in when I drove to the 
mall, but I decided to enter and investi- 
gate. Right in the middle of the store they 






Jennifer 
Nelms 




had a display of leather jackets. 1 found one that v\'as functional and fashionable with a bit of a swashbuckling 
flair and a mountaineering look that reminds me of some of mv few happy memories of childhood, exploring 
the forest of the Appalachian mountains. 1 was thrilled. Woods was a godsend. 

The biggest siu-prise, however, was with the shoes. 1 wore out mv old shoes walking from store to store 
without finding what 1 v\anted. Then I saw an adxertisement for eight\' percent off in the window of a place 
called Foot Locker. Now, where Woods was a place 1 had not thought of entering. Foot Locker was a type 
of place that 1 acti\ eh' a\ oided. The\' sold athletic footwear. The emplo\'ees dressed like referees. I ha\e noth- 
ing against athletics and ph\sical fitness. In fact, 1 ha\ e a black belt in Tae Kwon Do. Hov\'e\'er, 1 hate the males 
sports fan mentality, which this place obxiouslv caters to . But eighty percent off was a deal that 1 had to at 
least inxestigate, so I went inside and began to look around. 

After a while 1 realized something. H\ en though the store was selling a male 
sports fan mentalit\', what the customers actualh' bought were shoes and actually they 
were pretty nice shoes. I saw Heather walking b\-, and 1 called her into the store. She 

has the same feelings toward sports 
fandom as 1, and was surprised to find 
me in that store. But I showed her 
what I had discovered and she agreed. 
E\'entually she helped me pick out a 
pair of black tennis shoes that really do 
not look like tennis shoes from a dis- 
tance of trreater than three feet. 



Melissa 
Capps 




Matni 
Davis 





As I sit here waiting tor tliem to finish with my pants, 1 have to admit that I am nerxous about the 
opening. The outfit is sharp, but people are used to seeing me as easy-going, laid back, and messy. Will they 
accept this new image? Will I accept it? The outfit fits me beautifully, but i am still not used to it. And will 
people figure out what the outfit says about me, the wildy eclectic pieces that fit together logically to form a 
coherent whole? Would 1 be better off if people understood what it says about me? 

What the hell am I worried about? I'm going to look fabulous. 




Lori 
Bryant 



Melodie 
Henson 




TO P]S00\I^K THPfT X HAP SP^-AJT 

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Di Gregorio 




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Angela 
Brown 




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Thomas 




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Bailey 



It's that feeling you get when you've accomplished 

something really wonderful- Something you've 

done for yourself. That's how I feel. 

Katherine Brantley 




■ncjifjner 

'Editor 

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